Should we have the right to die?

I think we should

Interesting question. If a person is physically dying and don't want to live out their last days suffering then sure... Maybe. Actually, I think a person's spirit has a much better judgement of when it's time to go than a person's body, even their soul. You may choose different words for that representation. Death is inevitable, but I think it's rather unfair for an individual (for themselves, honestly) to decide to end their life before they even really begin to have one.

I mean both assisted suicide and well, unassisted suicide. Realistically speaking, someone hanging themselves in their bedroom isn't going to make their neck break, they will die from strangulation. So if someone found them, then they should just let them die. I mean people don't hang themselves unless they want to die. NO ONE does it for attention or a cry for help or any of that, because once you do it, you're a gonner unless someone finds you. And unfortunately it is required by law for whoever finds yout call an ambulance if you're still alive.

I agree with you OmgItsRira and blueultraviolet. A person truly knows better than anyone else or their body when it's time to die.

OmgItsRira:Interesting question. If a person is physically dying and don't want to live out their last days suffering then sure... Maybe. Actually, I think a person's spirit has a much better judgement of when it's time to go than a person's body, even their soul. You may choose different words for that representation. Death is inevitable, but I think it's rather unfair for an individual (for themselves, honestly) to decide to end their life before they even really begin to have one.?

At what age do you believe a life begins?

Assisted suicide, absolutely. Unassisted suicide isn't black or white, because for someone who is unassisted and not terminally ill, are probably suffering from depression or another kind of mental illness, or a mix of them. So they have a chance for treatment to find some sort of enjoyment in life, I know it's hard and a long process, but people can get there. I hate it when people say someone is selfish for commiting suicide when they're not. Someone has to be in a really dark place to want to actually end their life, and for many, it seems endless. I come from a priviledged family, so I had access to treatment when I was suffering from deppression and an eating disorder, others do not. I remember my depression feeling like a thick, dark cloud pressing on the inside of my head, giving me constant headaches and feeling like I was waiting for a happiness that was never going to come. But just because I managed to come out of it for the most part, doesn't mean everyone else will, and I will by no means judge someone who ends their life because they see no end to it even with treatment and things that would normally make someone happy, or if they have no access to treatment at all. Would I encourage someone to do it or think they should? Of course not.

I know their family and friends will suffer the pain, but that person was suffering, too. They're the ones who have to live with that monster inside their head. Often, people with mental illnesses aren't taken seriously, written off as dramatic, and just not believed at all. Add the unsupportive environment to the mix, and all you get is tragedy.?

Exactly. We have to lose the stigma and treat mental illness as we would physical illness. Our brain is an organ just like our liver and heart. What makes it unique is the complexity of the brain.?
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Huh. I don't think there's a particular age where you start living; that's up to the individual. There are many people who are alive, and not living. You can control your life-you can control the world, in a sense- because you can control the perception of it. Of course this is hard to do when life isn't easy. Life is supposed to be hard. You're not supposed to have it all. You'll run into people who you think has it all and you won't feel like they deserve it. You'll run into people that have had nothing and you'll feel deserve something.

The biggest issues that will cloud peoples' perception, in no particular order, would be a chemical imbalance in the body-which could be caused by stress, deficiencies, or disorders- loneliness, and trauma. It can even be a combination of all of these, but they do make life seem not-so-great. I've came across all of them, except by disorder, and I had the thought of wanting to end my life. One reason I didn't is because, I dunno, something clicked, and I refused to believe that that was all I had going for in life. There had to be more to it than this (my situation at the time.) I was also scared of knowing what would happen after I'd done it.

I suppose you can also add fear of the unknown to that list too. Though you can prepare for it, you can't really see your future, how it's going to map out. If someone was able to see their future, and saw that their life turned out pretty good all things considered, odds are they would want to live that life, and not end it so soon. But, If you figured out how a movie or book ended, you wouldn't care so much about what happened in between, and the experience wouldn't be as good for you. Same with life.

I've already had the thought of "would me a few years ago (6, to be exact) even imagine she would be where she is now? Did she ever think that she would be able to go to all of these cool places, meet lots of new people who will accept her for who she is, and would actually play a big role in someone's life, and their perception of it?"
The answer is no, and if old me decided to end her life right then and there, she never would have.

JustAsking:

OmgItsRira:Huh. I don't think there's a particular age where you start living; that's up to the individual. There are many people who are alive, and not living. You can control your life-you can control the world, in a sense- because you can control the perception of it. Of course this is hard to do when life isn't easy. Life is supposed to be hard. You're not supposed to have it all. You'll run into people who you think has it all and you won't feel like they deserve it. You'll run into people that have had nothing and you'll feel deserve something.The biggest issues that will cloud peoples' perception, in no particular order, would be a chemical imbalance in the body-which could be caused by stress, deficiencies, or disorders- loneliness, and trauma. It can even be a combination of all of these, but they do make life seem not-so-great. I've came across all of them, except by disorder, and I had the thought of wanting to end my life. One reason I didn't is because, I dunno, something clicked, and I refused to believe that that was all I had going for in life. There had to be more to it than this (my situation at the time.) I was also scared of knowing what would happen after I'd done it.I suppose you can also add fear of the unknown to that list too. Though you can prepare for it, you can't really see your future, how it's going to map out. If someone was able to see their future, and saw that their life turned out pretty good all things considered, odds are they would want to live that life, and not end it so soon. But, If you figured out how a movie or book ended, you wouldn't care so much about what happened in between, and the experience wouldn't be as good for you. Same with life.I've already had the thought of "would me a few years ago (6, to be exact) even imagine she would be where she is now? Did she ever think that she would be able to go to all of these cool places, meet lots of new people who will accept her for who she is, and would actually play a big role in someone's life, and their perception of it?"
The answer is no, and if old me decided to end her life right then and there, she never would have.?

So what counts as starting to live life? Enjoying it? Living on your own??

Feeling a sense of purpose, perhaps?

Yeah, sense of purpose is part of it. It also starts when you don't allow other people to dictate what you can and can't do with you life. I'll be a bit more clear with that last statement; people are going to say whatever they say about whoever they want, however you have the choice whether to follow it or not.

Part of life is enjoying it, but also understanding that there will be rough times as well, but those are temporary. A motto I like to go off a lot is: "if it were that easy, would it really be worth it?"

Living on your own may help out a lot with that, but of there is someone who has a major influence in (or has had a major vice grip on) your life, psychologically, you don't want to deal with the consequences that will come from deviating their wishes. That will go away with time.

In short, going out of your way to actively seek a way to have full grasp of your life, be it moving out, cutting people off, seeking help, etc, and maintaining those things will help in the long run with having more control of your life, and with living your life for you, and no one else. It's not yours if you can't own it, if that makes sense. Sounds easier said than done, but look back at the motto I posted.

As a general ethical principle, yes, people should have the right to die. But practically, that right has to be restricted to people who are competent to make a rational and fully-informed decision about it and communicate that decision. Otherwise the potential for abuse is far too great.

And if somebody attempts suicide and you find them alive, you absolutely need to call an ambulance, because you simply have no idea what happened or why.?Of course, sometimes the person knows exactly what they want and understands exactly what they are doing, but there are plenty of occasions where that isn't the case. They may be acutely manic or psychotic, they may have reacted badly to prescription or recreational drugs, they may be responding to a particular short-term situation or trauma that can be resolved, they may have been pressured, blackmailed or even physically forced. Whether or not death is the best option for them is not your call to make.

 

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